All tagged top ten

Walliser Cholera

Walliser Cholera

There is a persistent rumour that the dish is indeed named for the disease Cholera, after a particularly bad outbreak in the 1830. People in the Wallis stayed home to avoid contamination and were forced to use things they already had in their larder and gardens to feed their families.

More likely, however, is that it's named after the glowing coal in the fireplace where the pan would have sat to bake.

Papet Vaudois

Papet Vaudois

Legend has it that the Saucisse aux Choux Vaudois originated in 879 when German Emperor Charles the Fat visited the old Roman settlement of Orbe, today a small town in the canton of Vaud. Charles and his lackeys extended their stay, putting pressure on the supply of meat in the town. To make the meat last longer, the townspeople added cabbage and stuffed it in their sausages. Problem (deliciously) solved. 

Älplermagronen

Älplermagrone

Älplermagrone (or Magronä, depending on your dialect) is the Swiss version of mac and cheese. Much like the differences in dialect, the dish varies from region to region and debate rages on: what sort of cheese? Apple sauce or plum compote?  Fried cervelat, yes or no? (Is this really a question?) Crispy or sweet onions? 

I say, the more delicious add ons, the better.

Rüeblitorte

Rüeblitorte

A Swiss classic, I remember my mum's Rüeblitorte (carrot cake) fondly. She never iced it, so I always felt like I could eat it for breakfast. I asked her to send me her recipe, and she ended up sending both hers and my grandmother's. Rather than decide between the two, I diplomatically amalgamated them and came up with the following.