All tagged Wallis

Härpfilreschti

Härpfilreschti

This recipe comes from Marianne Kaltenbach’s Aus Schweizer Küche, where the potato is sliced in rounds and an interesting ingredient is added—Milchkaffee. If you don’t have it at hand, you can use just milk, or even a glass of white wine.

Walliser Cholera

Walliser Cholera

There is a persistent rumour that the dish is indeed named for the disease Cholera, after a particularly bad outbreak in the 1830. People in the Wallis stayed home to avoid contamination and were forced to use things they already had in their larder and gardens to feed their families.

More likely, however, is that it's named after the glowing coal in the fireplace where the pan would have sat to bake.

Apricot Spritzer

Abricotine Spritzer

High on a Walliser mountain is the tiny community of Mund, who harvest no more than five kilos per year. Saffron grows from crocus flowers, each bloom yielding only three thin scarlet threads. It takes over a hundred flowers to make a single gram, which can cost upwards of 30 francs.

Sii

Sii

Sii is a little like bread pudding, only with wine instead of milk. You soak the bread and dried fruit in wine overnight, then mix it together and warm it in some butter. I made two versions: one with Walliser white wine and apricots, and the traditional with red wine and raisins.