All in Unique Swiss Products

Stalden Creme

Stalden Creme

Produced since 1903, this vanilla pudding in a can has been a Swiss favourite for over a century.

It's named for the tiny hamlet where the first factory was built, Stalden, which today is a part of the larger community of Konolfingen and is where the Berneralpen Milchgesellschaft was founded in 1896.

And who founded that company? None other than master hotelier Caesar Ritz.

Absinthe

Absinthe

During the late 1800s absinthe was the drink of choice for bohemians and artists alike. Although now it's thought that much of its psychoactive properties were exaggerated, tales of hallucinations and mania led to the drink being vilified and banned in the early 20th century.

Ovomaltine

Ovomaltine

Ovomaltine is one of the most famous and recognizable Swiss products. It is a mix-in-milk powder made from malt, egg, and milk, and flavoured with cocoa. The original recipe was developed in 1904 in Bern and remains largely unchanged today.

Dr Maximilian Oscar Bircher-Benner

Dr Maximilian Oskar Bircher-Benner

During the early 20th century Switzerland was not just an alpine paradise for skiers and adventure seekers, but also for patients seeking retreats and cures in the fresh mountain air.

Sanatoriums could be found throughout the Alps, and one of the most famous belonged to Dr. Maximilian Oskar Bircher-Benner, the creator of Birchermüesli. 

Schabziger

Schabziger

Tucked next to the mammoth alpine wonderland of Graubunden, the tiny canton of Glarus has an equally beautiful landscape and proud culinary history. Although small, they are the canton with the most polarising contribution to Switzerland's cheese canonSchabziger.

Cervelat

Cervelat

Switzerland's favourite sausage is a heady mix of beef, pork and pork rind, bacon and seasonings, stuffed with ice (to help binding) into oxen intestines, smoked and then boiled. Or a similar mixture of the sort. According to the Kulinarisches Erbe, the name probably comes from the Latin cerebellum (which later becomes cervelle in French or cervello in Italian), as historically it contained pork brains.

Who cares what's in it, it's delicious!