All in Swiss Christmas

Walliser Cholera

Walliser Cholera

There is a persistent rumour that the dish is indeed named for the disease Cholera, after a particularly bad outbreak in the 1830. People in the Wallis stayed home to avoid contamination and were forced to use things they already had in their larder and gardens to feed their families.

More likely, however, is that it's named after the glowing coal in the fireplace where the pan would have sat to bake.

Boozy Balls

Boozy Balls

These boozy balls are ones you'll actually want to eat.

Often rum balls are made with leftovers—stale cake and cookies—but these are purpose built, using ground nuts as the base. And why ever limit yourself to just rum?

You can make them gluten-free, dairy-free, vegan, even booze-free—the variety is endless.

Vin Blanc Chaud

Vin Blanc Chaud

In mid December, I took in the Strasbourg Christmas market with my buddies Lauren and Emily. The highlight was lovely steaming cups of warm, spiced white wine that went right to our heads. 

A couple of sips and our eyes got glassy, our speech emotional, and the cobblestones became difficult to negotiate.

It was some good mulled wine. 

Spitzbuben

Spitzbuben

The jewel of the Swiss Christmas cookie tray is surely the Spitzbuben, with its elegant dusting of powdered sugar and bright ruby centre. According to the Kulinarisches Erbe, Spitzbuben are a relatively modern cookie in Switzerland, and were likely developed and named in the 20th century. The term Spitzbub refers to a mischievous boy, and the cookies may be so named because jammy faces were originally cut into the dough.